Tackling A Huge Garden In Easy Steps

Tackling A Huge Garden In Easy Steps

When you’re lucky enough to have a large expanse in your back garden, it can be an absolute blessing, especially in the summer months. However, staying on top of the care and upkeep can see you spend a lot of money and time to keep it all in ship shape, and this can encourage you to give up on the venture and allow the place to grow wild. Luckily, there are a few generally unheard of top tips that can help you to look after your large garden throughout every month of the year without having to exert mass amounts of energy or having to empty your bank account. So, if your green space is getting a little out of hand and you’d like a few ideas to sort it all out in no time at all, then read on to uncover some of the handiest hacks to make use of today!  Image Source – Pexels  Think Big If you have a big garden, then you have to think big. The largest space you can tackle should be your first port of call, and if this means seeking out landscaping services to lay the best possible foundations for you to work from, then so be it. When you look at your garden after a period of low quality care, there will be several bigger problems that initially jump out at you, whether this is over growing trees blocking out all light, or perhaps even weeds growing across your once lush green grass. Tackling these issues will give you the opportunity to identify any smaller improvements along the way, and speed up the process dramatically too.  Adding A Splash Of Color  Sticking exclusively with plain grass or even paving can make your garden seem like a huge mass of empty space. Putting no effort into the flora and fauna will create a garden that looks like nothing more than a field you might pass on a country drive, ultimately rendering part of the price you paid for your property to be somewhat pointless. Adding life and colour into the mix can change this completely, as planting different flowers not only adds aesthetic value but helps to attract and sustain wildlife too. A simple border of sweet smelling plants of all kinds will instantly improve the look and feel of your garden, and there’s no doubt about the appreciation you will get from all local bees!  Create Defined Sections  It can be tough to make proper use of all of the space that comes with a huge garden, and often this means sections get left behind and see no fun at all. Changing this can help you to stay on top of the upkeep more readily, as investing some time and money into making proper use of your garden with further encourage you to stay on top of its upkeep. You could have a BBQ area, a vegetable patch, a play area for children or a dining table and chairs for any summer meals...
Simple Gardening Tips to Boost Curb Appeal and Speed Up Your Home Sale

Simple Gardening Tips to Boost Curb Appeal and Speed Up Your Home Sale

Talk to any real estate agent, in any market, and they’ll tell you that curb appeal is critical to getting the best offer for your home.  That’s not just anecdotal—there’s data on the importance of curb appeal. According to HomeLight’s Q2 2019 Top Agent Insights report, 94 percent of agents say that curb appeal adds value to the seller’s bottom line.   But that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to hire a landscaping firm to completely redo your tired yard. You can achieve great curb appeal at relatively low cost and with a weekend or so of effort—just follow these simple gardening tips.  Mow and edge your lawn It’s amazing the difference a tidy front yard can make. It’s one of the most basic yard care activities there is, and yet so many people either don’t mow often enough, or don’t pay attention to the details, like edging.  Prior to listing your home for sale, and during the entire time that it stays on the MLS, keep your lawn mowed to precision. It will keep your home looking well-kept, while also creating an excellent backdrop for any planting or other details you add.  Choose flowers or greenery with your home’s color in mind When you walk into a nursery, it can be tempting to choose flowers or plants based solely on what appeals to your eye—bright pink zinnias, yellow snapdragons, blue forget-me-nots.  But it’s important to take into account the color of your home, so you don’t inadvertently choose colors that will clash. If your home is pale blue, for example, you probably want to go with purples or pinks, with an occasional blue sprinkled in for effect. You want enough color contrast to be striking, but not so much that it becomes jarring.  Mulch your beds Mulching is one of the best ways to improve curb appeal without much effort. Mulch creates a clear separation between planting beds and your lawn, pulling the yard together and making everything look instantly tidy.  In addition, mulch can lower the amount of maintenance your garden requires, as it will insulate the soil, aid in water retention, and help prevent weeds.   Keep hedges and trees trimmed If your yard contains hedges or trees, make sure to trim them back regularly. While you don’t  want them to look boxy—unless you’re a dedicated gardener with a geometric streak—you do want them to look like they’re under control and tamed. Nothing says neglect like a bush with countless stray branches reaching out to grab you! Add or emphasize your walkway If you’ve got a sidewalk that leads to your door, consider lining it with small solar lights to further define the edges and make the approach to your home more inviting.   If not, laying a simple stepping stone walkway is an excellent way to up your curb appeal.  This is especially true if your home has limited outdoor space, as a well-defined walkway can serve as a focal point that will draw potential buyers’ eyes away from the size of your yard. You can drastically improve your curb appeal with just a few simple steps. So break out those gardening gloves, find those hedge trimmers, and let’s get to...
Bringing amaryllis indoors

Bringing amaryllis indoors

Its time to bring your amaryllis indoors! Well, a few weeks ago was probably the time to bring your amaryllis indoors but it isn’t too late. I’ve been letting my amaryllis grow outside all summer. This has been so easy that I have, in fact, completely forgotten about them. I’ve been so proud of myself for the restraint I’ve shown because there is a little bit of space on my plant shelves… and then I discover yet another plant which I have not brought indoors. I planted my two amaryllis outside near the end of May. I tucked them behind some elephant ears and hibiscus and, truthfully, forgot they were there until I saw some amaryllis indoors at a garden center yesterday. I planted them directly in the soil and let them grow all summer. This is what they look like now: The bulbs themselves look healthy and the leaves aren’t even showing any damage from the frosts we’ve experienced. This is the first time I’ve planted these outdoors so I didn’t really know what to expect. I found that they popped out of the soil pretty easily. The largest had a pretty sizable clump of soil on it that I was able to break away before bringing this amaryllis indoors. I repotted both bulbs in separate containers with fresh potting soil. At this point they will go down to the basement to have some quiet time. I will stop watering them and will wait for the leaves to turn brown and desiccate before cutting them off. The ISU Extension suggests, “place the dormant bulb in a 50 to 55 degree F location for at least 8 to 10 weeks. After the cool requirement has been met, start the growth cycle again by watering the bulb and placing it in a well-lighted, 70 to 75 degree F location.” Since my bulbs have already experienced quite a bit of these cool temperatures outdoors I am writing a note on the calendar to pull these the week of Thanksgiving (approximately five weeks away). I am hoping this will have been enough time to trigger the flowering to come. I think I am in trouble. Leaving these bulbs outside and then bringing my amaryllis indoors was so easy that I am worried I will need more. Here we...
Succulent tables & Bloomingtables

Succulent tables & Bloomingtables

Who doesn’t love succulents? Who also has so many plants that they are running out of space? Just today I was introduced to Bloomingtables and I think this succulent table may be the perfect way to squeeze just a few more plants into our home! This project is still in the KickStarter campaign, but their beautiful design is sure to be a hit. I am a little dubious about plant selection and I think its going to be very important to select the right plants for your location. These older posts on growing succulents indoors and succulent terrariums will give you lots of good ideas for succulents that will do well without a ton of light. All of these will keep their great shapes and colors in darker rooms. And now I’ve started thinking, what would I plant in my BloomingTable? I am leaning toward mosses! Wouldn’t a table planted with lots of mosses, maybe selaginella be beautiful? It would need to be kept fairly moist, but the water tight design would be perfect for this. This post was written completely on my own behalf. I have not received any product or payment in exchange for my...
Japanese Themes to Transform Your Backyard

Japanese Themes to Transform Your Backyard

Flickr If you live in the West and you’re a little worried that your garden looks the same as your neighbor’s, then you might want to try a little Japanese inspiration.  Japan is a country, like many in the West, obsessed with its gardens. In Japan, the purpose of the garden is not to provide leisure or be a show of wealth, but to impart feelings of tranquility and peace. The cultural origins of gardens, therefore, are strikingly different from what many people are used to.  Because of this, gardens in Japan have a different style and theme. The focus is less on symmetry and formality, and more on creating the sort of places that allow the mind to wander from the troubles of the world. To put it bluntly, Japanese gardens are a kind of therapy.  So how do you create a Japanese garden? What are the principles behind such a project? Let’s take a look.  Include Lots Of Bamboo Flickr Bamboo is a type of grass, not a tree, even though it can grow as tall as trees and is solid to the touch. It’s not just food for pandas either; it’s a crucial ingredient in the average Japanese garden. Bamboo works exceptionally well as a form of natural fencing and is an excellent tool for enclosing small, narrow backyards, typical of so many Japanese suburbs.  Don’t Forget The Cherry Tree Japanese cherry blossom is famous all over the world, and for a good reason: it’s probably the most spectacular of all blossoming trees in the northern hemisphere. No Japanese garden would be complete without a cherry blossom bloom in the spring months.  Include Indigenous Plants Indigenous plants, like Weigela florida, give Japanese gardens an authentic appearance. Rhododendron plants also help to create the color palette that is emblematic of gardens from the region.  Include Water The Japanese believe that a garden is a place for meditation and reflection. Water has been a critical meditative aid for thousands of years, and so it should come as no surprise that it has made its way into the Japanese garden environment.  Both running water and still pools are acceptable since both help to create a profound sense of tranquility and serenity. Many Japanese gardens include small, decorative bridges over ponds to allow owners time and space for quiet contemplation of their existence.  Stone If you visit a large Japanese garden, you’re likely to find stone ornaments and symbols along the main walkways. These symbols are often purely for decorative purposes, although they may also be religious in nature.  If you don’t have any running water in your garden, you can use raked gravel to mimic the appearance of a flowing stream. You can use small bridges to traverse this ersatz feature, creating a more natural-looking environment.  Creating a Japanese-style garden is by no means easy. But once you understand the basics and put them all together, you can design something that stands...
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